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Telegraph Key, Clockmaking, and Other Books
By W. R. Smith


HOW TO MAKE A VERTICAL HIGH PERFORMANCE TELEGRAPH SPEED KEY

BY W. R. SMITH, BSME, FBHI, FNAWCC, CMC, CMW, CMEW, W4PAL

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I have just done a search of the Internet for books on the building of a telegraph speed key. None were found. Nor was anything found about the making a vertical telegraph speed key. Thus, this book appears to be the very first one ever written on the subject.

This key stands 7-1/4” tall, has a 3” x 3-3/4” x 3/4” thick brass base and is nickel plated. It will be one of the best performing keys that you own and you can take great pride in having built one of the world’s most unusual speed keys.

It has no dot contact post, no dot spring on the weight rod and no silver contacts. Instead, there is a collet on the weight rod that has a strong magnet bonded on its bottom. This magnet passes over a reed switch mounted in a 5/32”OD brass tube and closes it to make dots for the transmitter. The avoidance of friction from the normal dot spring and its silver contacts is why the key usually makes such an unbelievable number of dots. All other components of a normal speed key are present. The book is 60 pages, 8-1/2 x 11 and is spiral bound. It contains drawings and 145 color photographs of the step by step construction to guide the builder.

Here is the history of the original vertical speed key, and how my vertical keys came about. Around 90 years ago, Martin, the inventor of the Vibroplex telegraph speed key manufactured the world’s first vertical telegraph speed key. Its purpose was said to conserve space on the operator’s desk. Although highly collectable, no firm has made one since then. Thus, my above key is the first one offered since that date. The Martin key was so complex that I could not determine how it worked by a study of photographs. I had to resort to the patent drawings for an understanding. Most owners of the Martin vertical key are not very happy with how it performs.

Many years ago, on ham radio, I met a friend, Shelby (Coach) Rye, AD4WQ. He learned that I had made two speed keys earlier in my life and a code keyer switch later. He encouraged me to make another speed key. After much consideration, it seemed that to be of interest, such a key would have to be of a highly unusual design and be an excellent performer. A vertical key seemed to be the answer.

I accidentally solved the problem of how to make a short height, high performance, vertical speed key, with the paddles at finger height 62 years ago. This was while making a code keyer as my project in a mechanical engineering class, while a student at the University of Tennessee. Thus, I was in an excellent position to make an unusual, vertical speed key design of great simplicity, and high performance, compared to the Martin key.

A key was designed and made in short order and Coach came to check it out. We were both surprised to learn that instead of the usual 15 or so dots made by a normal Vibroplex speed key, this key made 105 of them before giving up. Coach has used his version of the key for the past 6 years and says it is the best of all of his speed keys. During this period, I ended up building eight highly unusual speed keys-most of them vertical.

At that time, 6 years ago, I did not think it logical to write a book for making the key, by a clockmaking author unknown in CW circles. However, since my book, How TO RESTORE TELEGRAPH KEYS, has become the bible for key collectors, and much of my restoration work has been seen on the Internet by CW people. Thus it now seems possible to justify the work and expense of publishing a book on how to make the key.

Those who have HOW TO RESTORE TELEGRAPH KEYS will find it a great adjunct to this book.


The book is available from the author/publisher at $45 (U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM

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SHERLINE IN THE WORKSHOP

BY W. R. SMITH, BSME, FBHI, FNAWCC, CMC, CMW, CMEW, W4PAL

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This book is spiral bound, 8-1/2 x 11, contains 102 pages and 220 figures—both photographs and drawings as required. Most of the information is how to do things with Sherline equipment that no one has ever done before. See how to mount the Sherline CNC indexing table on the Sherline lathe with a simple boss, a shaft clamp and a sheet metal restraining arm. This allows gear cutting of wheels with teeth from 2 to 999. Learn how a homemade hand crank can simplify threading with a tap or a die, as typically done with bench lathes. See how the same hand crank and a few accessories allow the winding of powerful fusee clock springs, as well as all other clock springs on the Sherline lathe. Learn a simpler way to make a Jacot tool for pivot polishing on the Sherline lathe. See how to make a FERGUSON PARADOX, that has endlessly puzzled people with its unexpected gear motions since the seventeen-hundreds. Learn how to mount the CNC indexing table on the Sherline milling machine with two simple fittings and one easy machining operation. This allows gears and multi-sided objects to be cut on the Sherline mill, as shown in the text. See how the Sherline headstock assembly can be mounted on a bench lathe for milling operatons.  Learn how to drive a Sherline headstock on a Sherline vertical slide with a sewing machine motor for gear cutting, as well as how to make the motor reversible. This avoids the problem of excessive weight that occurs when the headstock is driven with the complete Sherline motor and speed control on the vertical slide. View a chapter of other things that can be done with Sherline equipment, collected from my past writings. This is a book that greatly extends the usefulness of Sherline equipment in the workshop.


The book is available from the author/publisher at $45 (U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM

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CLOCK REPAIR FOR BEGINNERS
AND ADVANCED CRAFTSMEN

BY W. R. SMITH, BSME, FBHI, FNAWCC, CMC, CMW, CMEW, W4PAL

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When I wrote my last book in 2008, I was convinced that because of my advanced age, it would likely be the last one I would ever write. In 2009, remembering the many repair tricks from my early life not found in current clock repair books, I decided to write a book on clock repair. This effort was interrupted by open heart surgery and five bypasses. Following recovery, work was continued and the book was finally completed during the first part of 2011.

The book is 8-1/2” x 11”, has 122 pages and 382 figures. Except for the basic techniques offered to help the beginner get started, I have tried to avoid repeating most material found in current clock repair books. Thus, the reader will find unusual information, such as how to install clock bushing using the simple Preacher to maintain proper depthing, how to make a Jacot tool for pivot polishing on the Sherline lathe and the Myford lathe, a simple tool for doing lantern pinion work, tools for adjusting bent pallet escapements, a set of homemade pivot supports for pivot polishing are also offered. A simple homemade gage for measuring the correct length of in-barrel mainsprings is presented, as are a number of useful tricks, such as spinning true, screw length management tools, silver solder draggers, how to make index plates from scratch, adapting the Sherline lathe for wheel cutting and pinion making, the use of super glue arbors, a center finder for re- pivoting, a Sherline saw table, sheet metal drills, CNC indexing, replacing a ratchet wheel tooth, replacing train wheel teeth, making lantern pinions, cut pinions and factory type lantern pinions.

Included is information for making and using a pinion head depthing tool. Also illustrated is the use of a conventional depthing tool for correcting bad depthing in a clock train. Two methods for replacing broken barrel teeth are offered. The use of a bull’s-foot file and 35 mm film for reducing a bushing to plate thickness is illustrated. The usefulness of adjusting rods in clock repair is described, as is the technique for re-pivoting an arbor.

For the benefit of the beginner, I felt compelled to include some material found in other books, such as bushing plates with a conventional bushing machine, replacing a click rivet, bent pallet adjustment, etc.

It is likely that this book offers the most complete description of clock shop tooling and its uses of any book currently available. Some of the tooling is not found in any present book. Any beginner or advanced craftsman will find this book a great source of needed information.


The book is available from the author/publisher at $45 (U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM

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HOW TO RESTORE TELEGRAPH KEYS
MY LATEST BOOK—IN FULL COLOR (2005)
 
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After about six months of constant shop work, digital photography and writing, I have finally completed a new book, HOW TO RESTORE TELEGRAPH KEYS, and copies are available for shipment directly  from stock.

Although this book does not deal with clocks, it contains a wealth of workshop techniques not found in other clockmaking, clock repair books or machine shop texts. Thus it is an important source of workshop techniques and material sources.

The book is 8-1/2” x 11”, 107 pages and contains 254 high quality color photographs illustrating the various things being discussed. It offers a way to clean speed keys without doing the harm that results from washing one in the kitchen sink. Many “how to” things are offered, such as: how to dissolve broken steel screws in brass parts (in some cases, this could be worth many times the price of the book), make cylindrical and cubical key weights, shorting levers, bearing screws, rope knurled thumbscrews and thumbnuts, new dot contact assemblies, paddles, nickel plate key parts in the home shop, mix varnish and re-japan key bases, replace broken mainsprings, make shorting levers and their knobs, wind springs, heat-blue screws, remove rust from parts, coat parts to avoid future rust, remove or re-position dot bars on arbors (trundles), make dash levers, pendulum assemblies, thumbscrew posts, strip conductors and their insulators, where to order rubber feet, tools, materials, etc. The topics are simply too long to list.

The complete rebuilding of a couple of basket case telegraph speed keys and the total restoration of a large number of others are illustrated. Also included is a chapter describing the three vertical speed keys I have recently designed and built.

I have drawn on my 76 years of ham radio, 70 years of watchmaking/clockmaking and 40 years of mechanical engineering to offer what I believe will prove to be the bible of telegraph key work for owners and collectors for many years to come.


Praise for this book by Dr. Tom Perera, a doyen of key collectors (http://www.w1tp.com/mwr.htm)

"W.R.SMITH, W4PAL does the finest telegraph key restorations that I have ever seen. This is not surprising because he is a famous and world-class clockmaker and has published widely on the art and technology of building fine clocks. His new book makes all of his techniques available to any collector.

"WR's New Book: WR has published an extraordinary book that details every important step in the restoration and repair of telegraph keys. WR's book addresses the plating or japanning and pin striping of key bases, the making of needed key parts, the plating of small parts in the home shop, the replacement of mainsprings, the winding of coil springs, etc."


The book is available from the author/publisher at $60 ( U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal. Buy both this book and the companion DVD Restoring a 1914 Vibroplex Telegraph Speed Key, and receive both at a discounted price of $105.00. (When ordering both items through PayPal, select "DVD-Book Combo" below.)

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM

To order only the book through PayPal, use this button.

To order the DVD-Book Combo for a discounted price of $105.00, use this button.

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HOW TO MAKE A GEARLESS
GRAVITY ARM CLOCK

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This is indeed one of the most interesting clocks you will ever make. People stand in front of it for an unlimited time trying to decide how it runs and how it indicates the time it is keeping. The pivoted vane of the toggle, attached to the pendulum rod about 9" below the suspension spring, initiates the pendulum impulse cycle. Normally, the vane passes freely over the blued trigger of the impulse mechanism. As the pendulum arc decays, the vane eventually fails to pass the trigger and lands in the notch at its top. The next pendulum arc depresses the trigger and unlatches the gravity impulse arm. Its roller rolls down the incline plane of the pallet and impulses the pendulum. As the roller nears the bottom of the incline, silver contacts on its arm and the magnet armature close. The battery energizes the electromagnet, which re-latches the arm. The pendulum then swings freely for about 50 beats until its arc again decays and the cycle repeats. The time indicating mechanism is also quite unusual. A similar one was used by England’s Dr. Woodward in his string clock to both indicate the time and power the pendulum. These functions are reversed in this clock, so that the time indicator is powered by the pendulum. This inversion required several changes of the Woodward mechanism. The pin wheel gate was abandoned, a pivoted finger added to the pin wheel pawl and a spring loaded detent provided. The latter accelerates the pin wheel to a velocity greater than that imparted by the pendulum. This forces disengagement of the finger after it indexes the pin wheel. A pawl attached to the pendulum rod near the top indexes the ratchet wheel, which makes one revolution per minute in 1-1/2 second steps. One tooth of the wheel is cut deeper than the others. Once each minute the pawl drops into that deep tooth. There it engages a wire lever that is mounted in a pivoted body having a second wire lever. This last lever depresses the pin wheel pawl that has a hinged brass finger at its end. The finger catches one of the 60 pins on the pin wheel and indexes it one step and the minute hand one minute. The clock uses an Aaron Dodd daisy wheel cam mechanism for the 12 t0 1 hour hand ratio. This eliminates the usual motion work gear train and allows the clock to remain gearless. Although i have seen the clock keep time to less than a second per week, i consider it a novelty clock because with its open case dust accumulation on the parts can alter its time keeping ability.

The workshop manual for building the clock is now available from the author/publisher at $45 (U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal:

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM.

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HOW TO MAKE AN EPICYCLIC TRAIN STRUTT CLOCK Printable Page
A gold medal winner in the 2003 NAWCC International Craft Contest


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A work of art that will forever be cherished by your heirs. This is one of the most interesting of all single train skeleton clocks ever conceived. First made by an Englishman, William Strutt, about 1830, it has a number of interesting and extremely unusual features not found in other clocks. Its 8-day run, spring driven train is epicyclic (planetary gearing) and involves a ring wheel of 4-1/2" ID and 5-1/2 OD teeth. The motion work is based on the Ferguson Mechanical Paradox instead of the normal 12 to 1 gear train. To allow individual setting of the hands, the collets are of most unusual design. Both beautiful and unusual in the extreme, this clock is an excellent time keeper, which any Clockmaker will be proud to have made.

TRAIN—The center arbor carries the minute hand and is driven by a fusee/great-wheel assembly. Fixed to the center arbor is a planet arm having a counterweight on one end and a planet wheel and pinion on the other end. A sun wheel is fixed to the center of the dial and cannot rotate. The planet pinion engages this wheel and is forced to rotate while being moved around it by the planet arm. The planet wheel drives the internal teeth of the ring wheel, which is free to rotate on the center arbor. The external teeth of the ring wheel drive the escape wheel pinion. A conventional recoil escapement drives the pendulum. The Ferguson Paradox avoids the need for a 12 to 1 gear train between the hour hand and the minute hand.

The128 page, 378 figure workshop manual for building the clock is now available at $45 from the author/publisher (U.S. orders postpaid),  or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM.

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HOW TO MAKE A SKELETON WALL CLOCK Printable Page
Silver medal winner in the NAWCC international craft contest.


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Book Review By John Losch, Clockmaker.

I have just finished reading Bill Smith's latest book, "How to Make a Skeleton Wall Clock." As a life long clockmaker and machinist I am tempted to sometimes think I have seen it all, even if I know better. This book reminded me there are still things to learn, and I learned several from reading it. I can say without reservation that this is a "must read" book for every clockmaker. Bill writes with the same objective used by Donald DeCarle when he wrote "Practical Clock Repairing" 45 years ago. Each author showed step by step procedure for making a clock movement and in the process has shown the reader the steps required to accomplish competent fabrication of replacement parts needed in the repair shop. This means that by making either of these clocks the serious practitioner will have the satisfaction of making a clock from "scratch." Equally important, he will have expanded and improved his repair skills. Bill Smith's style of presentation accomplishes two valuable things. He gives his reader an understanding of the capabilities and limitations of tools, and a real understanding of why a procedure is necessary. Sources are recommended for both the materials and cutters needed to make the train wheels. There is a section on making fly cutters for both the winding ratchet and the escape wheel. Cutters are expensive, and to minimize costs, this clock is designed to use lantern pinions. Added to the economy of this design is the advantage to the reader of learning a technique for making lantern pinions, a subject inadequately treated in most clock books. Like many of Bill's other books, this one is a complete manual covering every aspect of the subject project. "How to Make a Skeleton Wall Clock" is comprised of twelve chapters which originally appeared in serial form in the "Home Shop Machinist" from Nov.1993 through Oct. 1995. There are 85 pages of text, and 280 photos and drawings. The format is 8-1/2 by 11" pages in a comb binder making the book convenient to use in the workshop. In order that there is no confusion, I offer the standard disclaimer. I have no financial involvement with Bill Smith, and this review is unsolicited by him. I just want to call attention to a project for the "hands on" clock crowd about which I am very enthusiastic. Jcl John C. Losch

The 85 page, 280 figure workshop manual for building the clock is now available from the author/publisher at $45 (U.S. orders postpaid),  or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM.

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HOW TO MAKE A LYRE SKELETON CLOCK Printable Page
Gold medal winner in the NAWCC international craft contest


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This workshop manual is a must for the clock repairer, and clockmaker. Detailed drawings and step by step photographs, supported by a carefully worded text illustrate the fabrication of every part of the clock. Even those who have no desire to build the clock will find the tooling and techniques of great help in their shop work. The text contains information for: Turning pivots by hand; extensive machining operations; wheel cutting; lantern pinion making; use of the fret saw; pouring lead pendulum bobs; the use of super glue for mounting small parts during machining operations; the use of Loctite 609 as a permanent bonding agent; making and using fly cutters; polishing brass and steel surfaces; blueing small steel parts; spoking wheels; making a wheel spoking template; using a dividing plate; extensive use of the watchmaker's lathe; spinning metal; silver brazing; threading small holes, knurling; using sheet metal drills; making a dust cover from 1/8" Plexiglas; bonding and polishing Plexiglas; broaching a square hole in a clock key; the use of stub arbors; super glue wheel cutting arbors; wheel train calculations; using the burnisher; using the adjusting rod; lacquering; cutting oil sinks; making a signet key; handmade reamers; a U.S., BA, and Metric small screw equivalent chart; using file buttons; and a full scale tear-out template for the sawing the clock plates. This clock, based on the pleasing lines of the Lyre, was designed and built by the author for entry in the annual Craft Contest of the National Association of Watch and Clock Collectors (NAWCC) and won a gold in international competition for handmade clocks at the National Convention in Orlando, Florida. The clock is of English pattern, with spring and fusee drive, maintaining power, a one piece hand pierced skeleton dial, and unusual sun and planet pinion motion work. It is wound from the front, has an 8-day run, and stands 16" above its black walnut base. The pendulum is rear mounted and has a heavy, brass shell bob poured with lead for high Q. A 1/8" thick plastic cover protects it from dust. The escapement is an original design by the author and is of the spring pallet type. To enhance animation, it has been enlarged and brought forward of the front plate for ease of viewing. Its action is lively, positive, quiet, and endlessly fascinating. The escapement is an unusual spring pallet design by the author.

The 86-page, approximately 30,000-word, 256-photograph workshop manual for building the clock is now available from the author/publisher at $45 (U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM.

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HOW TO MAKE A GRASSHOPPER SKELETON CLOCK Printable Page
Gold medal winner in the NAWCC international craft contest


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This workshop manual is a must for the clock repairer and clockmaker. Detailed drawings, and step by step photographs supported by a carefully worded text, illustrate the fabrication of every part of the clock. Even those who have no desire to build the clock will find the tooling and techniques employed of great help in their shop work. The text contains information for: Turning pivots by hand; extensive machining operations; wheel cutting; lantern pinion making; use of the fret saw; the use of super glue for mounting small parts during machining; the use of Loctite 609 as a permanent bonding agent; making and using fly cutters; a depthing tool for determining wheel to pinion center distance; polishing brass and steel surfaces; blueing small steel parts; spoking wheels; using a dimpling tool; using a dividing plate; extensive use of the watchmaker's lathe; spinning metal; silver brazing; threading small holes, knurling; using sheet metal drills; making a dust cover from 1/8" Plexiglas; bonding and polishing Plexiglas; broaching a square hole in a clock key; the use of stub arbors; super glue wheel cutting arbors; wheel train calculations; using the burnisher; using the adjusting rod; lacquering; cutting oil sinks; making a signet key; handmade reamers; an in-barrel mainspring length gauge; a U.S., BA, and Metric small screw equivalent chart. The clock won a gold medal in international competition for handmade clocks at the National Convention in Philadelphia. The text then appeared in serial form in England's Model Engineer. However, due to a publication failure, no complete text has ever before been available to the builder. These problems have all been corrected and the text is now complete and fully updated. As the name implies, the clock makes use of a grasshopper escapement. It is of English pattern, with spring and fusee drive, maintaining power, and a one piece hand pierced skeleton dial. It stands 16-1/2" above its black walnut base, is spring and fusee driven, has an 8-day run, and maintaining power. A compound pendulum is used to keep it tabletop size. The escapement has been brought forward for ease of viewing. It is fascinating to watch the pallets pick their way around the escape wheel while imitating the kick of a grasshopper with each passing tooth. This manual is likely the most complete text ever written on how to build a single clock. It contains 99 pages, over 35,000 words, 348 photographs and drawings. Information for building a number of special tools is also included. The double wheel grasshopper escapement was designed by the author.

The manual is now available from the author/publisher at $45 (U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM.

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WORKSHOP TECHNIQUES FOR CLOCKMAKERS & MODELMAKERS Printable Page

Workshop Techniques for Clockmakers and Modelmakers
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This manual contains all of the articles (except serials) written by W. R. Smith and published in The Home Shop Machinist, Projects In Metal, and England's The Clockmaker during past years. It is 8-1/2 x 11, with 108 pages and is comb bound to lie flat.

Examples of the information offered are:

How an inexpensive Sherline spindle can be adapted for use on bench lathes for milling, drilling, gear cutting, etc. Details for making a fly wheel to smooth the cut, a filing rest, a saw table, a T-rest, and cross slide and vertical slide locks, all for the Sherline lathe.  ▪ How to make indexing plates without the aid of other index plates or dividing heads. How a Sherline lathe can be used to configure itself for gear and pinion cutting and lantern pinion making without the need for a milling machine.  How to make a macro mill/drill spindle from junk watchmaker's heavy duty mainsprings on the bench lathe. Details for adapting the Myford and other bench lathes for use with 10 mm collets.  A tip over T-rest for use on the bench lathe. The cutting of a 6" diameter, 200 tooth gear on a standard Sherline lathe (lathe only). Details for making my T-rest design, which is now being produced by Sherline for their lathes—part # 2110. Hand turning is very fast—example, one can turn a 1/16" diameter pivot, 3/16" long on 1/8" diameter hardened and tempered music wire or blue pivot steel (un-annealed), chamfer the shoulder and round the end of the pivot in less than one minute. Information for configuring a Sherline lathe for cutting gears, pinions and making lantern pinions without the need of a milling machine.

Because many of the things offered are very unusual and are demonstrated on Sherline equipment, this manual is a must for Sherline users. However, the techniques are basic and are equally useful on other and larger lathes.

This book is available from the author/publisher at $45.00 (U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM.

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Clockmaking & Modelmaking Tools and Techniques Printable Page


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Book Review by Guy Lautard

Bill Smith is a master clockmaker, and his orientation is basically and undeniably clocks, BUT...Clockmaking & Modelmaking Tools and Techniques is most definitely not just for clockmakers. In this new 8-1/2 X 11" soft cover, 112-page, comb bound book, he has revised the best of his previously published articles in the British Horological Journal, Timecraft, Model Engineer, and Horological Journal. He has expanded and updated them as required, and put them together in book form. Any aspiring clockmaker will find a host of ideas worth many many times the price of the book. Included is an interesting idea for a method of winding coil springs in the bench vise, as well as considerable info on the workshop use of Super Glue Also included is a good section on the use of piercing saws for skeletonizing sheet brass, etc. He also shows how to hand-sharpen a twist drill so it will produce truly circular holes in sheet metal with ease and precision, and delves into button centers for filing circles in metal. A camera tripod accessory for workshop photography is detailed. Bill has used the prototype in making thousands of photos in his own shop in recent years.

I have by no means listed all the subjects dealt with in this book - such as the numerous good "shorties," i.e., resurfacing bench oilstones, a hint for safety in metal spinning, and so on. The book's contents are general enough that I believe any home shop machinist reader or clockmaker will find it a worthwhile addition to his bookshelf. The text is well written, in clear and easy style. Beautifully illustrated with well over 200 photos and dimensioned line drawings, this book is the distillation of shop methods of a master clockmaker's lifelong experiences. Get a copy!

The book is available from the author/publisher at $45 (U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM.

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Hypnosis Saved Her Life Printable Page


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A Novella by W. R. Smith

About 35 years ago, after having written a number of books of poetry and "how to" books for clockmakers, and having spent five years of my earlier life studying medical hypnosis and attending medical seminars on the subject, I decided to write a book, Hypnosis Saved Her Life - a charming love story illustrating the value of hypnosis to the average person. I hope you will enjoy this 201-page novella.

 

 

This book is available from the author/publisher in paperback form at $14 (U.S. orders postpaid), or through PayPal.

W. R. Smith
8049 Camberley Drive
Powell, TN 37849-4218
Phone: 865-947-9671
E-mail: WRSmith2@AOL.COM.

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Copyright ©2013 by W.R. Smith. All rights reserved. The content of this web site may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without the express written permission of W.R. Smith.


Copyright ©2014 by W.R. Smith. All rights reserved. The content of this web site may not be copied or reproduced in any manner without the express written permission of W.R. Smith.